Changes to children’s services at Ealing Hospital will support high quality seven-day services for all children in North West London

Planned changes to children’s services at Ealing Hospital will see the inpatient children’s ward close on 30 June 2016. The 24/7 Urgent Care Centre (UCC) will continue to treat children.

Planned changes to children’s services at Ealing Hospital will see the inpatient children’s ward close on 30 June 2016.  The 24/7 Urgent Care Centre (UCC) will continue to treat children1 and those requiring day care and outpatient care will still be seen at the hospital as normal.

After the 30 June ambulances will stop taking children to Ealing’s A&E unit and instead take patients to West Middlesex, Hillingdon, Northwick Park, Chelsea and Westminster or St Mary’s hospitals depending on the child’s emergency care needs.

The impact of moving the service from Ealing will see on average less than 10 children a day requiring either an overnight stay or on-going assessment moved from Ealing Hospital.

The planned changes will also introduce new services at Ealing Hospital including a new Rapid Access Clinic, providing GPs in the Ealing area with expert advice on children’s health and access to specialist appointments. The Children’s Community Nursing Team will also move to Ealing Hospital, ensuring the care children receive in hospital and in the community is coordinated, giving children access to the specialist team on site when needed.

Speaking on behalf of Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group, Dr Mohini Parmar said: “These changes were agreed by Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group Governing Body in May 2015. They are necessary to provide consistent high quality seven-day children’s services across North West London, allowing more specialist senior doctors to be available throughout the day and night to treat children. This will improve the quality of clinical care and patient experience by getting children back to health more quickly2.  

“It is important that people continue to use Ealing’s services as normal until the end of June. After that date those using the children’s services at Ealing Hospital can continue to do so with confidence.”

Details of the planned changes3 are already being shared with those families who use Ealing Hospital’s children’s services and with local community groups. In addition, a broader publicity campaign for residents in Ealing and surrounding areas will be launched in May 2016.



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Notes to editors

  1. In 2014/15 the majority of children who walked into Ealing hospital needing care were treated in the UCC. Examples of the types of care provided in the UCC include .sprains and strains, minor burns to small areas, minor cuts including: those needing stitches; common infections such as chest, ear or throat; or minor broken bones such as toes, ankle, wrist, fingers or collarbone.
     
  2. In line with quality standards set out by the London Quality Standards and Royal College of Paediatric and Child Health.
     
  3. Summary of key changes:
  • After 30 June urgent care for your children will be available 24 hours a day at Ealing Hospital through the Urgent Care Centre and in an emergency parents/guardians should dial 999 for an ambulance as they would now.
  • Ambulances will stop taking children to the A&E at Ealing Hospital as the children’s overnight ward is closing. Ambulances will take children to West Middlesex, Hillingdon, Northwick Park, Chelsea and Westminster or St Mary’s hospitals depending on the child’s needs.
  • If a child arrives at Ealing Hospital after 30 June needing more specialist care than the UCC can provide, they will be stabilised and safely transferred to another hospital.
  • All other children’s daytime services, including routine appointments and day clinics, sometimes known as outpatients will stay at Ealing Hospital and these services along with the urgent care centre should be used as normal.
  • Additionally, new services are being introduced in Ealing to make sure children can still be treated in the local area, either at the hospital or in the community.
  • Anyone using the children’s ward at Ealing Hospital should continue to do so with confidence; it remains a safe place for children’s care.